This site uses cookies in order to function as expected. By continuing, you are agreeing to our cookie policy.
Agree and close

« October 2019 »
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31

Glossary Element  biological diversity

Source
Contributor
Approved Yes
English term biological diversity
Language Translations
Dutch biologische diversiteit
Dutch/Belgium biologische diversiteit
French diversité biologique
French/Belgium diversité biologique
English definition - the variability among living organisms from all sources including, inter alia, terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological complexes of which they are part; this includes diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems. [CBD] (Syn.: biodiversity) It appears that the term 'biological diversity' was first defined as including two related concepts, genetic diversity (the amount of genetic variability within species) and ecological diversity (the number of species in a community of organisms) by Norse and McManus (1980). There are at least 25 more definitions of biological diversity. The one given on top is the definition used in the Convention text. Other definitions: - the totality of genes, species, and ecosystems in a region or the world. - the variety of life in all its forms, levels and combinations, encompassing genetic diversity, species diversity and ecosystem diversity. [FAO] - a variety or multiformity, the condition of being different in character or quality (R.Patrick,1983) - the variety and variability among living organisms and the ecological complexes in which they occur. Diversity can be defined as the number of different items and their relative frequency. For biological diversity, these items are organized at many levels, ranging from complete ecosystems to the chemical structures that are the molecular basis of heredity. Thus, the term encompasses different ecosystems, species, genes, and their relative abundance (OTA, 1987). - the variety of the world's organisms, including their genetic diversity and the assemblages they form. It is the blanket term for the natural biological wealth that undergirds human life and well-being. The breadth of the concept reflects the interrelatedness of genes, species and ecosystems (Reid & Miller, 1989). - the wealth of life on earth including the millions of plants, animals, and micro-organisms as well as the genetic information they contain and the ecosystems that they create (AID, 1989). - the variety of life and its processes (U.S. Forest Service, 1990). - encompasses all species of plants, animals, and microorganisms and the ecosystems and ecological processes of which they are parts. It is an umbrella term for the degree of nature's variety, including both the number and frequency of ecosystems, species, or genes in a given assemblage (McNeely et al., 1990). - the variety of life on all levels of organization, represented by the number and relative frequencies of items (genes, organisms and ecosystems (EPA, 1990). - the variety of genes, genotypes and genepools and their relationships with the environment at molecular, population, species and ecosystem levels (FAO, 1990). - the genetic, taxonomic and ecosystem variety in living organisms of a given area, environment, ecosystem or the whole planet (McAllister, 1991). - the full range of variety and variability within and among living organisms and the ecological complexes in which they occur; encompasses ecosystems or community diversity, species diversity and genetic diversity (Pending legislation, U.S. Congres 1991). - those environmental goals that go beyond human health concerns (Environmental Law Institute, Fischman, 1991). - the variety of life and its processes. It includes the variety of living organisms, the genetic differences among them, and the communities and ecosystems in which they occur (Keystone Dialogue, 1991) - the variety and variability of all animals, plants and micro-organisms on earth, - can be considered at three levels - genetic diversity (variability within species), species diversity, and habitat diversity (Overseas Development Administration, 1991). - I suggest a fourth category - functional diversity - the variety of different responses to environmental change, especially the diverse space and time scales with which organisms react to each other and the environment (J. Steele, 1991). - the totality of genes, species, and ecosystems in a region (WRI, IUCN and UNEP, 1992). - the total variety of life on earth. It includes all genes, species and ecosystems and the ecological processes of which they are part (ICBP, 1992). - full range of variety and variability within and among living organisms, their associations, and habitat-oriented ecological complexes. Term encompasses ecosystem, species, and landscape as well as intraspecific (genetic) levels of diversity (Fiedler & Jain, 1992). - the variety of organisms considered at all levels, from genetic variants belonging to the same species through arrays of species to arrays of genera, families, and still higher taxonomic levels; includes the variety of ecosystems, which comprise both the communities of organisms within particular habitats and the physical conditions under which they live (Wilson, 1992). - complex beyond understanding and valuable beyond measure, biodiversity is the total variety of life on Earth (Ryan, 1992). - the structural and functional variety of life forms at genetic, population, species, community, and ecosystems levels (Sandlund et al., 1993). - is the ensemble and the interactions of the genetic, the species and the ecological diversity, in a given place and at a given time (di Castri, 1995). - is the ensemble and the hierarchical interactions of the genetic, taxonomic and ecological scales of organization, at different levels of integration (di Castri & Younès, 1996). - the use of living organisms to control pests or disease. May be a single organism or a combination of a number of different ones. [CUB] - a natural enemy, antagonist or competitor, and other self-replicating biotic entity used for pest control. [FAO bis]
Language Translations
Dutch de variabiliteit onder levende organismen van allerlei herkomst, met inbegrip van, onder andere, terrestrische, mariene en andere aquatische ecosystemen en de ecologische complexen waarvan zij deel uitmaken; dit omvat mede de diversiteit binnen soorten, tussen soorten en van ecosystemen.
Dutch/Belgium de variabiliteit onder levende organismen van allerlei herkomst, met inbegrip van, onder andere, terrestrische, mariene en andere aquatische ecosystemen en de ecologische complexen waarvan zij deel uitmaken; dit omvat mede de diversiteit binnen soorten, tussen soorten en van ecosystemen.
French – la variabilité au sein des êtres vivants de toutes les origines incluant, inter alia, les écosystèmes aquatiques, marins et terrestres et les ensembles écologiques complexes dont ils font partie. Elle inclut la diversité au sein des espèces et entre les espèces et les écosystèmes. [CDB]. Il semble que le terme de diversité biologique a été défini pour la première fois comme englobant deux concepts liés, la diversité génétique (le degré de variabilité génétique au sein des espèces) et la diversité écologique (le nombre d’espèces dans une communauté d’organismes) par Norse et McManus (1980). Il y a au moins 25 autres définitions. La définition donnée ci-dessus est celle utilisée dans le texte de la Convention. Autres définitions: - la totalité des gènes, espèces et écosystèmes dans une région ou au niveau mondial. - la variété de la vie sous toutes ses formes, niveaux et combinaisons recouvrant la diversité des gènes, la diversité des espèces et la diversité des écosystèmes. [FAO] - variété ou multiforme, ou encore la condition d’être différent en caractères ou en qualité. (R.Patrick,1983) – la variété et la variabilité parmi les organismes vivants et les complexes écologiques dans lesquels ils apparaissent. La diversité peut être définie par le nombre d’éléments différents et leur fréquence relative. Pour la diversité biologique, ces éléments sont organisés à de nombreux niveaux, allant des écosystèmes complets jusqu’aux structures chimiques qui sont les bases moléculaires de l’hérédité. Ainsi le terme englobe différents écosystèmes, espèces et gènes et leur abondance relative. (OTA, 1987). - la variété des organismes du monde incluant leur diversité génétique et les assemblages qu’elles forment. C’est le terme générique pour la richesse biologique naturelle qui sous-tend la vie humaine et le bien-être. L’étendue du concept, reflète l’interrelation des gènes, espèces et des écosystèmes (Reid & Miller, 1989). - la richesse de la vie sur terre incluant les millions de plantes, d’animaux et de micro-organismes ainsi que l’information génétique qu’ils contiennent et les écosystèmes qu’ils créent (AID, 1989) – embrasse toutes les espèces de plantes, d’animaux et de micro-organismes, les écosystèmes et les processus écologiques dont ils font partie. C’est un terme générique pour le degré de variété de la nature, incluant à la fois le nombre et la fréquence des écosystèmes, des espèces et des gènes dans un assemblage donné.(McNeely et al., 1990). – la variété de la vie à tous les niveaux d’organisation représentée par le nombre et la fréquence relative de ses composantes (gènes, organismes et écosystèmes. (EPA, 1990) – la variété des gènes, des génotypes et des pool génétiques ainsi que leurs relations avec l’environnement aux niveaux moléculaire, des populations, des espèces et des écosystèmes. (FAO, 1990) – la variété génomique, taxonomique et écosystèmique des organismes vivants dans une zone donnée, l’environnement, l’écosystème ou la planète entière. (McAllister, 1991) – la gamme entière de variété et de variabilité parmi et entre les organismes vivants et les complexes écologiques dans lesquels ils apparaissent; embrasse la diversité des communautés ou des écosystèmes, la diversité des espèces et la diversité génétique ( législation en suspend, Congrès américain, 1991) – les enjeux environnementaux qui vont au-delà de la santé humaine (Environmental Law Institute, Fischman, 1991). – la variété de la vie et de ses processus. Cela inclut la variété des organismes vivants, les différences génétiques qui existent entre eux et les communautés et écosystèmes dans lesquels ils apparaissent (dialogue de Keystone, 1991) – la variété et la variabilité de tous les animaux, plantes et micro-organismes sur la Terre, qui peuvent être considérés à trois niveaux, la diversité génétique (la variabilité au sein des espèces), la diversité des espèces et la diversité des habitats (Overseas Development Administration, 1991). – est suggérée une quatrième catégorie, la diversité fonctionnelle, la variété des différentes réponses aux changements de l’environnement, notamment les diverses échelles d’espace et de temps sur lesquelles les organismes réagissent les uns envers les autres et avec l’environnement. (J. Steele, 1991) – la totalité des gènes, espèces et écosystèmes dans une région (WRI, UICN et PNUE, 1992). – la variété totale de la vie sur terre. Elle inclut tous les gènes, espèces et écosystèmes ainsi que les processus écologiques auxquels ils prennent part (ICBP, 1992) – la gamme entière de la variété et de la variabilité entre et parmi les organismes vivants, leurs associations, et leurs complexes écologiques tournés vers l’habitat. Le terme embrasse les écosystèmes, les espèces, et les paysages autant que les niveaux intra spécifiques (génétiques) de la diversité (Fiedler & Jain, 1992). La variété des organismes considérée à tous les niveaux depuis les variations génétiques appartenant à la même espèce en passant par un groupe d’espèces jusqu’aux groupes de genres, de familles et d’autres niveaux supérieurs de taxonomie. Elle inclut la variété des écosystèmes qui comprend à la fois les communautés d’organismes dans leurs habitats particuliers et les conditions physiques dans lesquelles elles vivent (Wilson, 1992). – complexe jusqu’à l’incompréhensible et d’une valeur au-delà de toute mesure, la biodiversité est la variété totale de la vie su Terre (Ryan, 1992). – la variété structurelle et fonctionnelle des formes de vie aux niveaux génétiques, des populations, des espèces, des communautés et des écosystèmes (Sandlund et al., 1993). – l’ensemble et les interactions de la diversité écologique, des espèces et de la génétique dans un lieu donné à un moment donné (di Castri, 1995). – l’ensemble et les interactions hiérarchiques des niveaux d’organisations écologiques, taxonomiques et génétiques à différents niveaux d’intégration (di Castri & Younès, 1996).
French/Belgium – la variabilité au sein des êtres vivants de toutes les origines incluant, inter alia, les écosystèmes aquatiques, marins et terrestres et les ensembles écologiques complexes dont ils font partie. Elle inclut la diversité au sein des espèces et entre les espèces et les écosystèmes. [CDB]. Il semble que le terme de diversité biologique a été défini pour la première fois comme englobant deux concepts liés, la diversité génétique (le degré de variabilité génétique au sein des espèces) et la diversité écologique (le nombre d’espèces dans une communauté d’organismes) par Norse et McManus (1980). Il y a au moins 25 autres définitions. La définition donnée ci-dessus est celle utilisée dans le texte de la Convention. Autres définitions: - la totalité des gènes, espèces et écosystèmes dans une région ou au niveau mondial. - la variété de la vie sous toutes ses formes, niveaux et combinaisons recouvrant la diversité des gènes, la diversité des espèces et la diversité des écosystèmes. [FAO] - variété ou multiforme, ou encore la condition d’être différent en caractères ou en qualité. (R.Patrick,1983) – la variété et la variabilité parmi les organismes vivants et les complexes écologiques dans lesquels ils apparaissent. La diversité peut être définie par le nombre d’éléments différents et leur fréquence relative. Pour la diversité biologique, ces éléments sont organisés à de nombreux niveaux, allant des écosystèmes complets jusqu’aux structures chimiques qui sont les bases moléculaires de l’hérédité. Ainsi le terme englobe différents écosystèmes, espèces et gènes et leur abondance relative. (OTA, 1987). - la variété des organismes du monde incluant leur diversité génétique et les assemblages qu’elles forment. C’est le terme générique pour la richesse biologique naturelle qui sous-tend la vie humaine et le bien-être. L’étendue du concept, reflète l’interrelation des gènes, espèces et des écosystèmes (Reid & Miller, 1989). - la richesse de la vie sur terre incluant les millions de plantes, d’animaux et de micro-organismes ainsi que l’information génétique qu’ils contiennent et les écosystèmes qu’ils créent (AID, 1989) – embrasse toutes les espèces de plantes, d’animaux et de micro-organismes, les écosystèmes et les processus écologiques dont ils font partie. C’est un terme générique pour le degré de variété de la nature, incluant à la fois le nombre et la fréquence des écosystèmes, des espèces et des gènes dans un assemblage donné.(McNeely et al., 1990). – la variété de la vie à tous les niveaux d’organisation représentée par le nombre et la fréquence relative de ses composantes (gènes, organismes et écosystèmes. (EPA, 1990) – la variété des gènes, des génotypes et des pool génétiques ainsi que leurs relations avec l’environnement aux niveaux moléculaire, des populations, des espèces et des écosystèmes. (FAO, 1990) – la variété génomique, taxonomique et écosystèmique des organismes vivants dans une zone donnée, l’environnement, l’écosystème ou la planète entière. (McAllister, 1991) – la gamme entière de variété et de variabilité parmi et entre les organismes vivants et les complexes écologiques dans lesquels ils apparaissent; embrasse la diversité des communautés ou des écosystèmes, la diversité des espèces et la diversité génétique ( législation en suspend, Congrès américain, 1991) – les enjeux environnementaux qui vont au-delà de la santé humaine (Environmental Law Institute, Fischman, 1991). – la variété de la vie et de ses processus. Cela inclut la variété des organismes vivants, les différences génétiques qui existent entre eux et les communautés et écosystèmes dans lesquels ils apparaissent (dialogue de Keystone, 1991) – la variété et la variabilité de tous les animaux, plantes et micro-organismes sur la Terre, qui peuvent être considérés à trois niveaux, la diversité génétique (la variabilité au sein des espèces), la diversité des espèces et la diversité des habitats (Overseas Development Administration, 1991). – est suggérée une quatrième catégorie, la diversité fonctionnelle, la variété des différentes réponses aux changements de l’environnement, notamment les diverses échelles d’espace et de temps sur lesquelles les organismes réagissent les uns envers les autres et avec l’environnement. (J. Steele, 1991) – la totalité des gènes, espèces et écosystèmes dans une région (WRI, UICN et PNUE, 1992). – la variété totale de la vie sur terre. Elle inclut tous les gènes, espèces et écosystèmes ainsi que les processus écologiques auxquels ils prennent part (ICBP, 1992) – la gamme entière de la variété et de la variabilité entre et parmi les organismes vivants, leurs associations, et leurs complexes écologiques tournés vers l’habitat. Le terme embrasse les écosystèmes, les espèces, et les paysages autant que les niveaux intra spécifiques (génétiques) de la diversité (Fiedler & Jain, 1992). La variété des organismes considérée à tous les niveaux depuis les variations génétiques appartenant à la même espèce en passant par un groupe d’espèces jusqu’aux groupes de genres, de familles et d’autres niveaux supérieurs de taxonomie. Elle inclut la variété des écosystèmes qui comprend à la fois les communautés d’organismes dans leurs habitats particuliers et les conditions physiques dans lesquelles elles vivent (Wilson, 1992). – complexe jusqu’à l’incompréhensible et d’une valeur au-delà de toute mesure, la biodiversité est la variété totale de la vie su Terre (Ryan, 1992). – la variété structurelle et fonctionnelle des formes de vie aux niveaux génétiques, des populations, des espèces, des communautés et des écosystèmes (Sandlund et al., 1993). – l’ensemble et les interactions de la diversité écologique, des espèces et de la génétique dans un lieu donné à un moment donné (di Castri, 1995). – l’ensemble et les interactions hiérarchiques des niveaux d’organisations écologiques, taxonomiques et génétiques à différents niveaux d’intégration (di Castri & Younès, 1996).
logo CBD logo NFP Belgium logo RBINS